South Pacific

Costa Rica

With the largest prehistoric rainforest along the Central American Pacific, Costa Rica's Osa Peninsula (Peninsula de Osa) is one of the most beautiful and biologically diverse locations on the planet. With few entry points, this jewel of Costa Rica remains relatively isolated, and it receives fewer visitors than many other parts of the country. Miles of uninhabited beach and the enormous Corcovado National Park make this southern tip one of Costa Rica's most stunning regions. Friendly people, amazing flora and fauna, and active rainforests all contribute to the South Pacific experience.

Due to the South Pacific's geographic location, high humidity and rainfall keep its vegetation flourishing year round. The scarcely populated region receives almost 200 inches (508 cm) of rainfall per year, and visitors should get ready to explore some wet and humid terrain!

While the region's valleys were once home to thriving banana plantations, much of the area is covered with dense rainforest, presenting some of the best wildlife-viewing opportunities imaginable. Traveling through the region, visitors can view an abundance of mangroves and estuaries along the coastline. A wealth of rivers supplies the area with amazing biodiversity and excellent white-water rafting, and the region's endless eye-catching views and captivating sunsets ensure for an insurmountable experience.

Costa Rica's South Pacific Region also contains Coco Island (Isla del Coco,) a remote island located 300 mi (480 km) offshore. The island harbors almost 9 mi^2 (24 km^2) of pristine natural wilderness within Coco Island National Park (Parque Nacional Isla del Coco), and research at the Park is dedicated to evolution of local plant, animal, and insect species, many of which are endemic to the area. Excursions to the island can be taken by boat or plane from various launch points on the Osa Peninsula. A trip to Coco Island is perfect for avid scuba divers who wish to marvel at the manta rays, whale sharks, and hammerheads that frequent Coco's beautiful waters.

Back on the mainland, the base of the South Pacific Region lies along the Pan-American Highway, a primary entry route for cars and buses. However, you can also reach the South Pacific by traveling along Highway 34, which runs down the scenic Pacific coast. The important city of Palmar Norte is a main hub for southern Costa Rica. It lies north of the Osa Peninsula, and it is a good 6-hour drive from San Jose. Adjacent to Palmar Norte, sits the tiny domestic airstrip of Palmar Sur, which receives daily flights from San Jose. Many of the main destinations around the Osa Peninsula also have airports. Flights to these airstrips will make the trip faster and more convenient, but it will also be more expensive. Southeast of Palmar Norte, in the small village of Chacarita, you can find a single road (245) that winds its way around the Dulce Gulf (Golfo Dulce). It ends in the isolated town of Carate on the border of Corcovado National Park. Here you will find endless white-sandy beaches in both directions. Carate seems to lie at the very edge of civilization; get ready for a taste of the final frontier!

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Costa Rica Attractions

Heres a list of Costa Rica's Amazing Sights and Attractions

Attractions
Destinations
Flora Fauna
Flora Fauna
 

Rhinoceros Beetle

 

House Gecko

 

Monkey Tail (Guaba chilillo)

 

Glass Frog

 

Common Basilisk

 

Spectacled Caiman

 

Hawksbill Sea Turtle

 

Leatherback Turtle

 

Fishing Bulldog Bat

 

Scarlet Macaw

 

Long-tailed Hermit

 

Boa Constrictor

 

Olingo

 

Common Dolphin

 

Spiny Green Lizard

 

Leaf-Cutter Ant

 

Puma

 

Blue-jeans Frog or Strawberry Poison-dart Frog

 

Millipede

 

Resplendent Quetzal

 

Monarch Butterfly

 

Magnificent Frigatebird

 

Jaguar

 

Green Page Moth

 

Two-Toed Sloth

 

Fer-de-Lance

 

Green Heron

 

Bare-necked Umbrellabird

 

Turquoise-browed Motmot

 

Agouti

 

Ocelot

 

Bottle-nosed Dolphin

 

Coati

 

Red-Eyed Leaf (Tree) Frog

 

American Crocodile

 

Baird's Tapir

 

Owl Butterfly

 

Tonka Bean Tree

 

Keel-billed Toucan

 

Vampire Bat

 

Humpback Whale

 

Barbachele

 

Spider Monkey

 

Ground Anole

 

Brown Pelican

 

Mantled Howler Monkey

 

Tarantula

 

Army Ant

 

Arboreal Termites

 

Giant Toad or Cane Toad

 

Kinkajou

 

Pacific Spotted Dolphin

 

Golden Orb Weaver

 

Great Green Macaw

 

White-Faced or Capuchin Monkey

 

Glasswing Butterfly

 

Armadillo

 

Pink Shower Tree

 

Stinking Toe Tree

 

White Leadtree

 

Fiery-billed Aracari and Collared Aracari

 

Ice Cream Bean Tree

 

Margay

 

Walking Stick

 

Long-tailed Manakin

 

Tayra

 

Green Turtle

 

Brilliant Forest Frog

 

Assassin Bugs and Kissing Bugs

 

Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata)

 

Common Tink Frog

 

Zopilota

 

Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

 

Narrow-headed Vine Snake

 

Collared Peccary

 

Loggerhead Sea Turtle

 

Oncilla

 

Jaguarundi

 

Orca, Killer Whale

 

Milk Frog

 

Elephant Ear Tree

 

Andiroba

 

Black Ctenosaur

 

Helicopter Damselfly

 

Fin Whale

 

Scorpions

 

Cook

 

Black Witch

 

Squirrel Monkey

 

Three-wattled Bellbird

 

Saman (Samanea saman, aka Albizia saman)

 

Blue Morpho

 

Chestnut-headed Oropendola

 

Violet Sabrewing

 

Olive Ridley Sea Turtle

 

Bananaquit

 

Spotted Longwing

 

Three-Toed Sloth

 

Bullet Ant

 

Paca